Old Plank Farm

The People's Pantry

Blog by Christine Immel

          The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #6      July 25, 2017

These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.  The menu might include items that are not on this list.

Item: Use In:
Garlic *  Texas Caviar  *Bean Burritos  *Fresh Salsa  *Medjool Date and Nut Pasta
Scallions *Salads   *On Bean Burritos   *Texas Caviar   *In Scrambled Eggs  *In Chicken Veggie Soup 
Lettuce or salad *Salads   *Bean Burritos  *BLT
Cabbage *Use on Bean Burritos in place of Lettuce  *Coleslaw  *Chicken Veggie Soup
Bell Pepper *Salads   *Texas Caviar  *Scrambled eggs with peppers and onions
Basil *Tomato, Basil and Mozzarella Salad  *Add to Mayo for BLT  *Add to Salad
Green Beans  *Salads   *Chicken Veggie soup
Tomato *Salads   *Texas Caviar  *Tomato, Basil and Mozzarella Salad  *Sliced Tomatoes with salt and Pepper  *BLT
Swiss Chard (Choice Box Item)  *Salads  *Pasta with Chard   *Chicken Veggie Soup  *In place of spinach in Medjool Date and Nut Pasta

 

Kitchen Tip

We are in the middle of a series on economizing in the kitchen.  Since last week, I have had my nose in three different depression-era cookbooks.  I am in my glory now because I LOVE this topic.  If you knew me well enough, my personal motto is "necessity over desire" and you would also know that I believe intentional deprivation breeds gratitude.

The over-arching message I am getting from these depression era books is this:  "We didn't have a lot, but were happier than most people are today".  When you live in a space of "necessity", gratitude grows in abundance.  Where there is gratitude, there is happiness.

On a more practical side, many households had a garden to supplement their diets.  They had basics in their pantry to build the backbone of their menu, enriched these items with a garden that gave them fresh produce in season and then canned goods off season.  Meat was sparse, only served once per week or made to stretch over many meals.  Put it all together and it sure sounds like the kind of diet I promote today.  Meat light, lots of Veg and fresh fruit, and real whole foods (local is best) to round it out.  Simple.  Uncomplicated.  Nutritious.  Inexpensive. 

Here is a list of kitchen staples that was recommended in one of my depression era cookbooks.  I've adapted it slightly.  When you read about it, think about your pantry.  Can you simplify in any way?

1. Bread

2. Milk

3.  Potatoes

4.  Onions/Garlic

5.  Tomato Juice or Tomato Sauce

6.  Coffee or Tea

7.  Basic Staples:  Flour, Yeast, Butter, Jam

8.  Spices:  Salt, Pepper, Chili Powder

9.  Mustard, Mayo

10. Oil (coconut, Canola, Olive Oil)

11.  Rice, Pasta

12.  Oats

13.  Protein:  Meat, Poultry, Eggs, Cheese, Dried Beans, Nuts and Seeds

14.  In Season Garden/Farm Produce (Veg, Fruit, Herbs)

15.  Sweetener (Sugar, Honey, Maple Syrup)

16.  Baking:  Baking Powder, Baking Soda

 

Rye Bread

Have you ever wondered why I have Rye Bread on my menu all the time?  I have found a recipe that my family loves and I make 2 loaves a week.  I try not to buy store-bought bread and I do occasionally make white bread as a treat.  Here is my family's bread recipe taken from the cookbook More-with-Less:  Recipes and suggestions by Mennonites on how to eat better and consume less of the world's limited food resources; by Doris Janzen Longacre  (this cookbook was recommended to me by an OPF CSA member and I HIGHLY recommend this cookbook as well):

Ruggenbrot (Rye Bread) Recipe (click here) 

Our next topics:

1.  In a Food Emergency

2.  Make it Last

3.  Make it Stretch

 

Week #6 Menu (July 28-August 3rd)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Fruit Salad

Yogurt w/Honey

French Toast

Bacon

Egg Sandwich with cheese on

Rye Toast

Oatmeal with Raisins and Walnuts

Almond Milk

Scrambled Egg with Peppers and Onions

Rye Toast

Jam

Oatmeal with Raisins and Walnuts

Almond Milk

Scrambled Egg

Rye Toast

Jam

L

Green Salad with Boiled Egg and Croutons

Fresh Pears

BLT

(use bacon from breakfast)Sandwich with Basil Mayo

Green Salad

Cottage Cheese

Pita Chips

Radish Sandwich

Yogurt with Honey and Blueberries

Green Salad

Black Beans

Salsa and Sour Cream

Tortilla Chips

Left-over Chicken Veggie Soup

Rye Bread

 

Tomato, Basil and Fresh Mozzarella Salad drizzled in olive oil, salt and pepper

Rye Bread 

S

Bean Burritos

with Lettuce, Tomato, Cilantro, and sour Cream

Fried Mushrooms and onions (with a tad of tomato sauce)

Closlaw

Rye Garlic Toast

Texas Caviar

Tortilla Chips

Crock Pot Chicken

Rice Pilaf (Cook Rice in broth with chopped celery and carrots)

 

Chicken Veggie Soup

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Pasta with Chard

Green Salad

Medjool Date and Nut Pasta

Sliced Tomatoes with Salt and Pepper

 

            

 

   The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #5      July 18, 2017

 These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.  The menu might include items that are not on this list.

Item: Use In
Lettuce * Salads   *Southwest Chicken Salad    *Hummus Wrap
Fresh Garlic

*Hummus   *Sauteed Green Beans and Garlic   *Veggie Pizza *Veggie Soup *Home-made Salad Dressing for Salads

Cippolini Onions  *Pot Roast   *Salads  *Crock Pot Chicken with Roasted Veggies   *Peas and Pasta   *Sausage Potato Skillet    *   Veggie Soup  *Southwest Chicken Salad
Kale  *Smoothies    *Salads     *Cheesy Kale Chips  *Sauteed and added to Roasted Veggies over Quinoa
Carrots *Salads  *Beef Pot Roast    *Crock Pot Chicken and Roasted Veggies  *Veggie Soup   *Carrot Sticks 
Cilantro *Salads    *Southwest Chicken Salad   *On top of Veggie Stew   *On Hummus Wrap
Green Beans *Veggie Soup   *Crock Pot Chicken and Roasted Veggies   *Salads 

 

Kitchen Tip

For the next few weeks, I would like to focus on frugal cooking.  This weeks post was inspired by a friend of mine who is in her late 80s and raised 10 children in the 1940s and 50s.  This time period was after the time period considered as the Great Depression, however, many of the habits, recipes and values from the depression era were passed on to the next generation.

I don't consider myself a history buff by any means, but I love listening to stories from this time period.  Especially stories from the kitchen. The part of me that is quite minimalist and frugal relishes in the simplicity of this era.  I don't mean to minimize the hardship that many Americans faced, but I would like to explore their resourcefulness and ability to adapt to circumstance.

This week, I've included a few recipes from this era in my menu.  I've simplified things quite a bit.  My friend Dolores cooked for a family of 12 by keeping things simple.  I intend to experiment with a little more simplicity.

You will also notice I placed my main meal at noon. I would like to see if this will work for my family with the kids being home for the summer.  It's something I've always wanted to try. 

Next week we will jump in with more hints and tips. In the meantime, enjoy this video of Clara sharing a depression-era Italian recipe that is veggie versatile (Pizza):

Clara's Kitchen: Pizza

And remember!

Use it up.

   Wear it out.

      Make it do.

        Or do without  :)   (A popular saying from the depression era)

 

Week #5 Menu (July 21-27)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

 

 

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Green Smoothie

Rye Toast with Almond Butter

Scrambled Eggs

Bacon

Rye Toast

Orange Juice

Bread Pudding

Orange Juice

 

Scrambled Eggs

Rye Toast

Orange Juice

Green Smoothie

Rye Toast with Almond Butter

Fried Egg

Rye Toast

Orange Juice

Green Smoothie

Banana Nut Muffins

L

Beef Pot Roast

Potatoes, Carrots, and Onions

 

Grilled Salmon

Potato Pancakes (with left-over mashed potatoes)

Sauteed Green Beans and Garlic

Rye Bead

Crock Pot Chicken with Roasted Veggies (prepared in Crock pot together)

Couscous

Southwest Chicken Salad

Tortilla Chips

Sausage, Onion, Pepper, Potato Skillet

Green Salad

Veggie Pizza

Peas and Pasta

Green Salad

S

Pot Roast Sandwiches

Carrot Sticks

Veggie Dip

Leftover Green Beans and Garlic Sauteed in broth with Kale

Served on Quinoa

Leftover Chicken Roasted Veggies and Couscous

Grilled Cheese

Tomato Soup

Cheesy Kale Chips

Leftovers from lunch

Veggie Soup

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Hummus Wraps with Provolone Cheese, Lettuce, Onion, Cucumber and Mayo  

 

 

 The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #4      July 11, 2017

These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.  The menu might include items that are not on this list.

Item: Use In
Lettuce * Salads  *In place of Arugula in Arugula, Fennel, and Green Lentil Salad
Celery *Salads   *Breakfast Skillet   *Spaghetti    *Chicken Veggie Stew   *Chicken Fried Rice 
Fennel *Arugula, Fennel and Green Lentil Salad   *Fennel and Onion Braised Pot Roast with Carrots
Scallions *Breakfast Skillet   *Spaghetti  *Green Salads   *Arugula, Fennel and Green Lentil Salad  *Curried Bubble and Squeak  *Chicken Veggie Stew   *Fried Rice   *Salmon Burgers
Kale *Add to Cherry Limeade Smoothie  *Add to Breakfast Skillet  *Add to Green Salads    *Add to Spaghetti Sauce  *Curried Bubble and Squeak   *Chicken Veggie Stew
Cherries *In Yogurt Parfait    *Gluten Free Cherry Almond Bread   *Cherry Limeade Smoothie   *Serve with Cottage Cheese and Pita Chips 

 

Kitchen Tip

This week, I had a request to cover some tips on freezing. (Thanks Toni!)Freezing is one of the best ways to preserve your harvest!  Here is a link to a document from the University of Wisconsin Extension that covers everything you need to know about freezing.  You will find Cherries on page 14 and the list of veggies begins on page 16.

Freezing Fruits and Vegetables

A side note about Kale:  It is not necessary to blanch your kale before freezing.  Simply wash with water, pat it dry with a paper towel and freeze in a freezer-safe storage container or freezer bag.  Frozen Kale is best used in smoothies or cooked dishes rather than fresh salads.

Time-Saving Tip:  Freeze your smoothie ingredients together (Kale, Pineapple, Banana, blueberries, strawberries, etc.) in single serving freezer bags to save time!  Cut wash and peel your fruit, de-stem, wash and dry your Kale and place all the ingredients for one smoothie serving in a freezer bag and label it.  When you are ready for a smoothie, just empty a bag into the blender with some fluid (water, juice, milk, almond milk, coconut milk)  and you are done!

I did not find info on Fennel or Scallions in this document, so here it is:

Freezing Fennel

Scallions:  Rinse and dry.  Simply chop your green onions into small pieces and freeze in a freezer bag or freezer-safe container.  It will last for months! 

 

Week #4 Menu (July 14-20)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

 

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

(2)Pancakes w/ Bacon

Breakfast Skillet w/Eggs, Ham, Potato, Celery, Green Pepper, Scallions, Garlic Scapes

Rye Toast

Yogurt Parfait w/ Plain Yogurt, Honey, Cherries and Granola

Orange Juice

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

(2)Gluten Free Almond Cherry Bread

Boiled Egg

Orange Juice

Cherry Limeade Smoothie

(Nectarine or Peach, Cherries, Lime Juice and Almond Milk, and Ice)

L

Cottage Cheese

Cherries

Pita Chips

Leftover Spaghetti

Grilled Cheese Sandwiches

Carrot and Celery Sticks

Cherries

Large Green Salad w/Black Beans

Leftover Chicken  and Veggie Stew

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Large Green Salad w/Cottage Cheese Large Green Salad w/ Guacamole and Tortilla Chips
S

(2)Spaghetti with Meat Sauce (add sautéed scapes, celery, chopped Kale, and scallions to the sauce)

Green Salad

Arugula, Fennel and Green Lentil Salad

(2)Rye Bread

Crock Pot Chicken

Curried Bubble and Squeak (a fried mixture of potatoes and kale)

Chicken and Vegetable  Stew (From Yesterday's Chicken Bones)

Green Salad

(2)Rye Bread

Chicken Fried Rice

Fennel and Onion Braised Pot Roast with Carrots

 

(2)Salmon Burgers

Sweet Potato Chips

 

 

The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #3      July 5, 2017

These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.  The menu might include items that are not on this list.

Item Use In:
Salad Mix

*Barbeque Chicken Salad     *Green Salads    *Tacos   

*with Tuna Salad

Beet Greens *Salads    *Stir Fry
Radishes *Salads
Kohlrabi *Kohlrabi with Honey Butter
Baby Carrots *Carrot Sticks    *Chicken Noodle Soup   *Stir Fry    *Kohlrabi with Honey Butter
Garlic Scapes *Veggie Omelet  *Added to Taco Meat   *Salads   *Chicken Noodle Soup   *Red Beans and Rice   *Stir Fry
Snap Peas *Sugar Snap Peas with Orange-Ginger Butter 

 

Kitchen Tip

This week I wanted to focus on salads.  My menus so far have suggested green salads because lettuce is plentiful this time of year.  But as the season progresses, we will have a variety of different salad options.  As you plan your meals, keep in mind, there is more than one way to prepare a salad.  Here are a few ideas if you ever get stumped:

 

Green Salads (Caesar, Garden, Spinach Salad)

Entrée Salads (Cobb, Greek, Antipasto, Taco, Chef, Southwest)

Meat Salad (Chicken Salad, Tuna Salad, Egg Salad)

Slaws (ie: Coleslaw, Apple-carrot slaw, Broccoli slaw)

Gelatin Salads (with fruits and/or veggies)

Pasta Salad (Macaroni, Italian)

Fruit Salad (Waldorf)

Potato Salad

Grain Salad (with Rice, Quinoa, Millet, Couscous)

Bean Salad (Texas Caviar, Three Bean Salad)

As I was looking for salad ideas, I ran into this list of 15 salads that are entrée worthy.  I plan to work my way through this list and try every one as the veggies for them are ready :)  Here is a link to the 15 Best Healthy and Easy Salad Recipes:  Click Here  I decided to include the barbecue chicken salad recipe in this weeks menu simply because my husband makes the best barbecue chicken on the grill.  Yum!

 

Week #3 Menu (July 7-13)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

(2)Pancakes w/ Sausage

Veggie and Cheese Omelet

Rye Toast

Yogurt Parfait w/ Plain Yogurt, Honey, Berries and Granola

Orange Juice

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

Fried Ham, Egg and Cheese Sandwich on Whole Grain English Muffin

Orange Juice

 

Green Smoothie w/Banana, Blueberries, Celery, Greens, Water

L

Cottage Cheese

Cherries

Pita Chips

Leftover Tacos

or

Taco Salad

Sliced Cheese

Whole Grain Crackers

Carrot and Celery Sticks

Large Green Salad w/Black Beans

Leftover Chicken 

Noodle Soup

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Large Green Salad w/Cottage Cheese Large Green Salad w/ Guacamole and Tortilla Chips
S

Beef Tacos

Top with:

Lettuce Tomato Scallions Shredded Cheese Sour Cream Salsa

Tortilla Chips

(2)Red Beans and Brown Rice

Kohlrabi with Honey Butter

 

Crock Pot Chicken

Sugar Snap Peas with Orange-Ginger Butter

White Rice

Chicken Noodle Soup (From Yesterday's Chicken Bones)

Green Salad

(2)Rye Bread

(2)Chicken Stir Fry

White Rice

Barbecue Chicken Salad (see link under Kitchen Tips)

Tuna Macaroni Salad

Baked Beans

Potato Chips

 

 

 

 The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #2     June 27, 2017

These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.  The menu might include items that are not on this list.

Item Use in:
Salad Mix

*Green Salads

*Green Smoothie

*Serve just about anything "on a bed of lettuce"

*Add to Sandwiches

Snap Peas

*Eat raw with or without Dip

*In a salad

*In a stir-fry

Kale

*Kale Chips      *Smoothies

*In Salads      *In Soups

Lettuce

*Served with Nachos

*Green Salad *Green Smoothie

Scallions

*Mini Quiche

*On top of Nachos

*Chicken Rice Vegetable Soup

*In Salads

*On Baked Potato

Maple Syrup

*Pancakes, waffles, French toast

*Sweeten plain yogurt, coffee/tea, hot cereal

*Use as a sweetener in baking

Kitchen Tip

I make crock pot chicken once per week.  It easily feeds my family of 5 for at least 2 meals.  The first meal is chicken served with sides and the second meal is soup made with the leftover chicken meat and bones.  I use whatever veggies I have on hand.  Homemade bone broth is very nourishing and inexpensive.  Here's what I do:

1.  Make Chicken in crock pot, seasoned however you would like.  No need to add fluid.  I cook mine on high for 5 hours.

2.  Serve your family.  Keep the leftover bones in the crock and refrigerate overnight. 

3.  The next morning, scrape off the fat that has settled on the top.  Leave the gelatin at the bottom!  This is the part you want.  Add enough water to cover and add 1 tablespoon vinegar to the water to pull the minerals out of the bones.  Let that sit while you roughly cut up one onion, 1 or 2 stalks of celery, and one large carrot.  Add to crock.  Set to high for 5 hours (8 hours on low).

4.  Remove veggies, bones and meat pieces with slotted spoon.  Pour broth through a strainer and into a large pot.  Add any combination of veggies (carrots, onion, cabbage, peas, celery, kale, corn, potatoes, garlic scapes, herbs) along with 2 bay leaves, a tsp of thyme, and 1/4 tsp of pepper and cook till tender.  Add a starch (rice, pasta, quinoa etc) and continue to cook until done.  Lastly, remove any leftover meat from the bones, and throw them in the pot with everything else.  Add salt to taste.  Dinner is done.  Serve with fresh bread and a salad.

Week #2 Menu (June 30-July 6)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

Also, you don't need to follow this  menu to a "T".  I plan a menu, but life happens.  Last weekend our family decided to go camping last minute and the menu changed and things were moved around.  If you have leftovers, eat those up.  Need a break from the kitchen?  Cold cereal will do.  The plan can be altered.

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

(2)Pancakes w/ Bacon

(2)Mini Quiche made in muffin tins with kale, Scallions, ham, and shredded cheese

Rye Toast

(2)Strawberry Muffins

Boiled Egg

Orange Juice

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

Scrambled Egg

Rye Toast

Orange Juice

Raisin Toast

Green Smoothie w/Banana, Pineapple, Celery, Greens, Water

L

BLT Sandwiches with Basil Embellished Mayo

Snap Peas

Milk

Leftover Nachos

 

Cheese Quesedillas

Kale Chips

Large Green Salad w/Black Beans

Leftover Chicken Rice Soup

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Large Green Salad w/Cottage Cheese Large Green Salad w/ Guacamole and Tortilla Chips
S

Nachos

  Layer in a glass baking dish:

refried beans, prepared taco meat, and cheese

Bake at 350 till hot

Top with:

Lettuce Tomato Scallions Shredded Cheese Sour Cream Salsa

Tortilla Chips

Penne Pasta with Shrimp and Garlic Scape Kale Pesto

Garlic Bread

Crock Pot Chicken

Rice Pilaf

Green Salad

Chicken Rice Soup (From Yesterday's Chicken Bones)

Green Salad

(2)Rye Bread

(2)Chicken Stir Fry

White Rice

Veggie Pizza

Green Salad

Grilled Salmon

Baked Potato w/Sour Cream and Scallions

Steamed Broccoli

Farmer's Favorite Fennel Salad

 

 

Hope this is helping so far!  Have you done something with your veggies that you want to share on a future blog?  Send me a message!  I would love to hear from you!  thepeoplespantry@gmail.com

  The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Week #1 June 20, 2017

These items are based on what I got with my delivery including choice box.  Your items may vary.

Item Use in:
Salad Mix

*Green Salads

*Green Smoothie

Snap Peas *Eat raw with or without Dip
Parsley

*Parsley Pasta Sauce

*Parslied Potatoes

*Mashed Potatoes

*Green Smoothie

*Dehydrated for Storage

Lettuce

*Chicken Cobb Lettuce Wraps

*Served with Tacos

*Green Salad *Green Smoothie

Garlic Scapes

*Breakfast Skillet

*Taco Meat

*Chicken Noodle Soup in place of or in addition to Onions

*In place of Garlic in Sesame Chicken

*Red Beans and Rice

*Guacamole

*Cheese Meatloaf

Basil (Large Share Only) *Freezer Pesto (not on this Menu) *Green Salads

Kitchen Tip

Now that weekly deliveries have begun, you might want to adjust your kitchen routine and shopping schedule a bit. Here is my new schedule just to give you an idea.  

Sunday: OFF

Monday: Clean Out Refrigerator and Freezer. Make a note of perishables and meat on hand.

Tuesday: Delivery Day! Process Veggies for Use and Storage. Check Sales Ads. Plan Menus

Wednesday: Grocery list. Grocery Shopping. Put away groceries. Work on Blog.

Thursday: Post Blog. Baking Day. (Rye Bread, Muffins, Quick Breads) Friday: House Blessing (clean the kitchen 😊)

Saturday: Make kitchen staples (ie: Yogurt, Stock, Hummus, Dessert of the week )  

Week #1 Menu (June 23-29)

Due to my own time limitations, I can only provide 2 recipes per week.  Recipes that use veggies take priority in this blog.  You can Google recipes you are interested in or wait for the recipes to come up on future posts. If I know the source of the recipes, I will list it below the menu. If a recipe can be doubled and frozen, you will see a (2) in front of it.

  Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
B

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

(2)Pancakes w/ Bacon

Breakfast Skillet w/Eggs, Ham, Potato, Green Pepper, Garlic Scapes

Rye Toast

(2)Banana Blueberry Muffins

Boiled Egg

Orange Juice

Hot Cereal w/Nuts and Raisins

Almond Milk

Scrambled Egg

Rye Toast

Orange Juice

Leftover Cornbread muffins w/ Butter and Honey

Green Smoothie w/Banana, Pineapple, Celery, Greens, Water

L

Nut Butter Sandwiches

Snap Peas

Milk

Leftover Tacos

OR

Taco Salad

Chicken Cobb Lettuce Wraps w/Leftover Chicken Large Green Salad w/Black Beans

Leftover Chicken Soup

Green Salad

Rye Bread

Large Green Salad w/Cottage Cheese Large Green Salad w/ Guacamole and Tortilla Chips
S

Beef Tacos w/ Lettuce Tomato Shredded Cheese Sour Cream

Tortillas

Crock Pot Chicken

Parslied Potatoes

Green Salad

Cheese Meatloaf

Mashed Potatoes

Corn 

Chicken Noodle Soup (From yesterdays Chicken Bones)

Green Salad

(2)Rye Bread

(2)Honey Sesame Chicken

White Rice

(2) Red Beans and Brown Rice

Snap Peas w/ Dip

(2)Cornbread Muffins

Baked Tilapia

Pasta w/Parsley Pasta Sauce

Green Salad

 Recipe Sources:

Banana Blueberry Muffins:  Meuer Farms

Chicken Cobb Lettuce Wraps:  Betty Crocker

Easy Guacamole:  All Recipes.com

Crock Pot Chicken:  100 Days of Real Food

Honey Sesame Chicken:  Living Well Spending Less

Red Beans and Rice:  Hillbilly Housewife  

 

The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry

Menu Planning: Putting it all Together

Last time we talked about menu planning and finished the following steps:

1.  Develop a 7-Day Meal Template

2.  Pick 5 "Veggie Versatile"  Recipes that fit into your template.

3.  Develop 10 Dinner Main Ideas that fill your template

4.  Create a Reference List of Sides:  Veggies/Fruits, Starches

Let’s Put it all Together!

Using the meal template, main ideas and sides examples from last week, you will see a completed week’s worth of dinner menus in the chart below.  I’ve added one asparagus recipe and one rhubarb recipe because its in season right now 😊

Day Sun Mon Tues Wed Thurs Fri Sat
Main Chicken Stir Fry Crock Pot Chicken Dinner Grilled Salmon Chicken Rice Soup Red Beans and Rice Beef Tacos Black Bean Soup
Veg/Fruit Carrot Celery Broccoli Onion Green Salad Steamed Broccoli Green Salad Brussels Sprouts Lettuce and Tomato Carrot and Celery Sticks
Starch Rice Aspara-gus and Lemon Risotto Garlic Bread Whole Grain Bread Rhubarb Crisp Corn Tortillas and Mexican Rice Whole Grain Crackers

 

 

Tools

To keep all of your menu ideas together, use one of the following:

1.    A simple list on the refrigerator. I use this method when I need a menu planned in a pinch just before I do my shopping

2.    A printed chart like the one above in my example. Print yourself a template or find one to use online. Plan out 2-3 weeks worth of menus and just rotate the weeks.

3.    Write your weekly plan on a notecard. Plan out 2-3 weeks worth of menus and just rotate the weeks.

4.    Keep a menu planning calendar.

5.    Use post its on a calendar. In this case, you can move the post it notes around and forward to future menus. In fact, you can plan out as many meals as you would like on post its and just keep moving them forward

6.    Keep a menu planning binder with meal templates, shopping lists, menus and recipes.

Breakfast and Lunch

I tend to be a creature of habit when it comes to breakfast and lunch. Maybe you are too. Either way, here are some ideas:

Breakfast: Smoothies, Eggs, Omelets, Hot Cereal, Cold Cereal, Muffins, Quick Breads, Seasonal Fruit, Egg/Veggie/Potato Skillets, Pancakes, French Toast, Parfaits, Yogurt, Toast

Lunch: Leftovers, Salads, Soups, Sandwiches, Wraps, Veggies and Dip, Quiche, Boiled Eggs, Cheese and Crackers, Smoothies Your

Breakfast and lunch can be planned like your evening meals, or you could just have a list of choices to choose from and pick what sounds good.

Room to Grow

This menu is very basic. There are more things you can do to save time and energy in the kitchen as your menu planning becomes more advanced. You will learn how to start with your weekly share of veggies in planning your menu. You will learn how to cook once and serve twice. To save time, you might cook ahead and freeze for a hurried dinner in the future. Prep can be done ahead of time. Herbs can be dried and preserved. Veggies can be blanched and frozen.

I am sure that by the end of this growing season, you will have exercised your full potential of culinary veggie skills. I know we will learn a lot together. We will likely be sharing meals with each other in the sense that we are all dining on the same veggies weekly and perhaps the same recipes as well. We will be dining “in community”.

I’d love to hear from you! Send me your thoughts for this blog this season! thepeoplespantry@gmail.com

At Your Service,  

Christine Immel

Next Time: The next blog post will coincide with our first delivery. I will be simplifying the format to include kitchen tips, menu ideas and two recipes per week.  

 

 

            The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry   

   How Many Recipes Does it Take to Build a Menu?   

Food has always been a hot topic in the media.   There is no lack of cookbooks, magazines, television shows, food blogs, nutrition advice, and products and ideas to make your life in the kitchen more "simple".

I'm here to tell you there is a wide gap between the sensationalized food in the media and what I serve at my table.  Fancy recipe overload paralyzes me.  Nutritional advice is way more complicated than it needs to be. My family is not interested in the latest food trend.  My kids are not impressed by exotic foods.  My pocket book calls for a good portion of practicality, and I need my food choices to contribute to a healthy lifestyle. 

I enjoy trying new recipes as much as you do, but if I'm going to be putting food on the table everyday, I need some basic healthy stand-by recipes to get the job done. 

You have enough influence in the media to inspire you for special occasions and new food adventures.  It is my job to help you lay a basic foundation that is practical and relevant to you.  It begins with menu planning. 

The Basic Plan

Now we are getting to the good stuff!  I am excited about this blog post because I know how much of an impact it will have on your life.  I am also excited because I am going through this process right along with you in order to plan for the season.  This is an opportunity for me to get organized as well!

To begin, we will just focus on dinner menus.  Breakfast and lunch will be easy after the evening meals are planned.  If you feel ready, go ahead and work on Breakfast and Lunch as well.

Your Menu Building Blocks

Grab yourself four pieces of paper and a pencil or sit down at your computer.  We are going to work through this list together.

1.  Develop a 7-Day Meal Template

2.  Pick 5 "Veggie Versatile"  Recipes that fit into your template.

3.  Develop 10 Dinner Main Ideas that fill your template

4.  Create a Reference List of Sides:  Veggies/Fruits, Starches

 

 

7-Day Menu Template

A meal template gives you a place to start.  It is not recipe specific, but provides the backbone of your recipes.  Example:

MONDAY           Crock Pot Meal 

TUESDAY          Fish/Seafood Meal

WEDNESDAY     Soup and Salad and Bread or Muffins

THURSDAY        Vegetarian

FRIDAY             Comfort Food (Pizza, Cheeseburgers, Tacos)

SATURDAY       Casserole/One Pot Meal

SUNDAY           Stir Fry

My template is built around cost, convenience, variety and nutrition.  You can adapt this template with your own preferences. 

5 Versatile Veggie Recipes

Pick 5 of these.  Make sure they will fit somewhere into your 7-day menu template.  Here are some examples of Recipes that are "Veggie Versatile":

Vegetable Frittata

Garden Vegetable Lasagna 

Fresh Garden Salad

Veggie Soup 

Veggie Pizza

Dinner Main Ideas - Pick 10

These are recipes you and your family enjoy.  They need to easily fit into your weekly template to make menu planning simple. I've provided 13 to get started.  Some are variations of the same basic menu ie:  Beef/Pork Pot Roast 

Casseroles/One Pot: Escalloped Potatoes and Ham,  Chicken Broccoli Casserole 

Stir Fry:  Chicken Stir Fry

Crock Pot:  Crock Pot Chicken Dinner, Beef Pot Roast

Fish/Seafood:  Grilled Salmon, Baked Tilapia

Soup:  Chicken Noodle Rice Soup, Bean/Lentil Soup

Vegetarian:  Vegetarian Chili, Macaroni and Cheese

Comfort Food:  Cheeseburgers, Tacos/Nachos/Naked Burritos

 

List of Veggies/Fruits and Starches

These are ideas to round out your 10 Dinner Main Ideas you have chosen.  List as many ideas as you would like.  Example:

Veggies/Fruits

Applesauce, Asparagus, Baked Apples, Beets, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Green Beans, Green Salad, Spinach, Pickles, Squash, Any CSA Veggie Combination

Starches: Bread, Beans, Biscuits/Rolls, Corn, Cornbread, Muffins, Noodles/Pasta, Potato, Tortilla Chips, Tortilla (corn or flour), Potatoes, Sweet Potatoes, Rice (Brown/White), Quinoa, Millet

 

A Note About Nutrition

The menus I will be sharing with you include a variety of fresh, whole, high quality, and local and organic foods.  It is a basic clean eating plan that is suitable for a family with children.  The variety and quality is enough to meet most nutritional needs.  My menus will tend to be light  on meat and grains with a focus on fruits and vegetables.  These menu ideas can be adapted to a variety of eating styles from Paleo to Vegetarian and I encourage you to adapt recipes as needed for allergies and intolerances.  When there is flexibility in a menu, I will point it out and offer substitutions when I can.

Book Recommendations

There are a few books I am super excited about that I wanted to share with you.  If our goal is to eat more veggies this season, these books will be great additions to your library:

River Cottage Veg; 200 inspired Vegetable Recipes by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall  (Mine and Angelica's Favorite by far...

and

From Asparagus to Zucchini:  A guide to cooking Farm-Fresh Seasonal Produce Madison Area CSA Coalition

My next post will pull things all together for you. The plan is to build a menu to practice from before we get our first box in June.  Also, I will provide you with the tools I use to keep your menu planning quick and easy.

 

At Your Service,

 

Christine Immel

 

Questions?  Feedback?  Suggestions for future posts? 

 

I’d love to hear from you!thepeoplespantry@gmail.com                                    

 

Next Topic for the end of May:                                                            

 

Let's Build a Menu!  Your Tools For Success

 

 

 

                       

 

          The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple's Pantry   

Your 2017 CSA Kitchen Primer                           

                     By Christine Immel

Let’s go over some of the lessons I have learned in menu planning, shopping, storage, and meal preparation over the last 20 years in the kitchen.   The following list summarizes some practices that have helped me.  Throughout the season, I will be approaching each topic in more detail.

Meal Planning

1.     What’s for Supper?

Meal planning is essential.  It is the most effective way to save money on groceries, simplify meal times, and keep a balanced diet.   

2.      The 7 S’s

Full utilization of our veggies is our goal this season. There are 7 universal uses for them:  Salads, Smoothies, Soups, Stir Fry, Simple Sides, Seasonal Casseroles, and Store for later.  Yes, I cheated by adding the word “Seasonal” to casserole.  I couldn’t think of an “S” word that was another word for casserole.  If you can think of one, shoot me an e-mail! :) 

3.     Go-To-Recipes

All you need to streamline your meal planning process, is 3-5 flexible recipes main dish recipes that call for “veggies of your choice” (ie: Soups, Stir Frys, Seasonal Casseroles).  In addition, you will need at least 3 recipes or uses for each veggie in our box.  Please keep in mind, simply prepared single vegetables have this magical way of perfectly complementing each other on your plate.  

4.     Keep-it-Simple

Simplify your recipe resources.  There is such a thing as recipe overload.  Its paralyzing. Use your Go-To Recipes first.  Then if you wish, new and exciting additions can be added to your menu. 

5.     Give your CSA veggies Priority

Seasonal menu planning begins with seasonal produce first.  Then we fill in the blanks to round out our meals.   

Shopping

1.     Shop Weekly

Your CSA box arrives weekly.  I will be sending out suggested menus on Fridays along with Angelica’s list of CSA items to expect the following Tuesday delivery. If you can squeeze your shopping in between Friday and Monday, that would be ideal.  

2.     Staple Shopping Checklist

Keep a master list and just check the box when you run out.  

3.     Price List

Keep a small notebook of items you purchase on your staples list, including household items and record the best possible price you can purchase this item for.  It will take the guesswork out of finding a good deal.  

4.     Less is More

Having many options to eat might seem like what you want, but in my experience, not having to think about what you are going to eat is easier. For example, pick two fresh fruits, or two cereals during your weekly shopping trip.  You can switch it up when you run out. 

Storage

1.     Organization is Key

You must be able to find everything to know what you have on hand before meal planning and shopping.  Designate a place for everything.  Keep your refrigerator, freezer, and pantry clean.  

2.     Avoid Overstocking

Buying in bulk may save money, but can sometimes be wasteful or too indulgent.  Stock up on things you know you will not over-use just because it’s there.  One example is treats for the kids.  My kids know I limit the treats and when they are gone, they are gone until next shopping trip.  Also, do not over-purchase perishables.  

3.     Clean Sweep

Clean out the fridge, organize your pantry, clean off your counters and take stock of inventory before you get your weekly share.   

4.     Inventory

I recommend keeping a list of produce on your fridge and highlight what needs to be used or processed quickly.  A deep freezer list is also helpful.  Keep an inventory of any food that you store that is not easily seen at a glance when you open your refrigerator or pantry.  It will save you time later.

Food Preparation

1.     Produce Processing Day

On Tuesday, the same day you receive your share, wash, chop, trim, process, and store everything based on your weekly menu.  

2.     Home-Made Staples

If time allows, consider making your own:  Stock or Bone Broth, Yogurt, granola, bread, trail mix, hummus, seasoning mixes, bakery etc. I've added 2 suggested staple recipes for you to the website:  Lentil Stew and Herbed White Bean Hummus 

3.      Food Prep Day

This is for convenience.  On Sunday, bag your bulk snacks into individual portions.  Make your home-made weekly staples.  Make some intentional leftovers to pack in lunches or freeze for later to use in a pinch during the week.  The idea is to do whatever you can ahead of time before your busy week begins.  

4.     Staging Your Meals

Check your meal plans every night before bed to pull items to thaw.  Stage your dry ingredients before getting started.  I stage my dry ingredients first thing in the morning for the evening meal. 

Cooking

1.     Get Your Mind Right!

Cooking is not a chore.  It is an expression of love and a creative endeavor. 

2.     Make it Count

Savor this time of day.  Turn on some music.  Light a candle.  Use pretty dishes.  Send gratitude to your local grower.  

3.     Be Creative…or Follow the Recipe

Some people prefer to add their own personal twist to written recipes or rarely even follow a recipe at all!  Others prefer to follow the recipe.  Both styles are okay. 

4.     No Pressure

We are not short order restaurant cooks.  It should be a written rule somewhere that the family chef should be able to make what they want and take as long as they please to prepare it!    

At Your Service,

Christine Immel

Questions?  Feedback?  Suggestions for future posts? 

I’d love to hear from you!thepeoplespantry@gmail.com                                    

Next Topic for April:                                                            

How Many Recipes Does it Take to Build a Menu?                                                                                                                                                                                                   

The Pehttp://www.clker.com/cliparts/p/6/V/i/M/H/tomato-hi.pngple’s Pantry

                The Value of Your CSA Dollars

                                                                                             By Christine Immel

This month I’d like to explore value with you.  Let’s look at the definition of “value” as it might relate to your CSA Dollar.  

Value

There are 3 definitions of value I’d like to explore taken from an online Webster’s Dictionary:


:  Relative worth, utility or importance

Definition #1 This definition is related to the level of “usefulness”.  We don’t need to ask ourselves if food is useful.  It is vital and necessary for our survival as a species.  We don’t decide if we are going to eat, but we DO decide what we are going to eat.  This leads me to definition #2…



:  A fair return or equivalent in goods, services or money for something exchanged

Definition #2 This definition of value might be described as “what you get for your money”.  This is important.  I don’t know about you, but I tend to have a finite amount of money.  I have a budgeted amount of money each month that goes towards feeding my family.  I need to be conscious of my spending.



:  Something (as a principal or quality) intrinsically valuable or desirable

Definition #3 This definition is related to the value that is not always quantifiable.  How do you quantify the emotional, social, educational, and functional value of your CSA dollar?  You can’t.  Your choices in life are based on what you value and reflect what is most important to you. If we are living a purposeful life, we know what we value, and we live our lives “on purpose”.


Here are some values that might have played an important role in your decision to be an Old Plank Farm CSA member:

Change        Contribution    Social Responsibility    Money

Collaboration    Health        Sustainability        Quality

Community        Purpose        Utility            Variety


If I were to imagine that my CSA dollar was a pie, and my values made up the pieces, my pie might look like this:


Your Money

Even though my intrinsic values make up over half of my pie chart example, that does not mean money is not important.  Quite the contrary!

Your CSA weekly share will cost less than the same items purchased in your local grocery store.  However, some items can’t be found in your local grocery store. For this reason, and the unquantifiable value of freshness, quality, and convenience, cost savings is difficult to calculate. But, if you practice the following strategies, you will be ahead of the game:

  • Make sure your CSA share is a replacement for a bulk of your grocery bill, not an additional expense

  • Challenge yourself to save in another area of your budget

(example: eating out) in order to live out your values with your CSA dollars

  • Stay on top of your weekly CSA inventory

  • Keep your storage areas organized (refrigerator, freezer, pantry)

  • Plan meals, recipes, and menus around your weekly share

  • Store (Freeze, dehydrate, can) what you don’t plan to use within one week

  • Process your produce the day it comes home

As your kitchen companion, I plan to help you save money using these techniques listed.  Food wasted is money spent.  A missed menu opportunity is money spent.  

At the very least, I hope to help you absorb the costs of your CSA dollar into your budget.  More than that, it is my personal goal to help you save money on your monthly grocery budget overall, while adding a tremendous amount of value at the same time!

Next month, I will go over some of the lessons I have learned in shopping, storage, menu planning, and meal preparation over the last 20 years in the kitchen.  Consider it a kitchen primer for the upcoming season


At Your Service,

Christine Immel

Questions?  Feedback?  Suggestions for future posts?  I’d love to hear from you!

thepeoplespantry@gmail.com


                                Next Topic for February:

                                Your 2017 CSA Kitchen Primer


 
 Eat More Veg.
January 25th 2017

                                                                                                          By Christine Immel

Hello CSA members!  Welcome to The People’s Pantry, a blog offered exclusively to Old Plank Farm CSA members in order for you to make the most of your CSA deliveries.

When I first became a member of a CSA in 2009, I would have loved to have the support to get the most out of my weekly delivery and this is the support I would like to offer you this coming season.
My motto, advice, personal goal, and challenge for you is to Eat More Veg.  The nice thing about this nutrition advice is that it will not be contested by peer review studies, is not likely to change in a few years, and is not likely to confuse you.  It is a simple, solid piece of advice no matter what diet or lifestyle you adhere to. I realize you all come from different backgrounds, you all know which style of eating keeps you feeling your best, and that you all know the value of organic locally grown veggies. 

With these things in mind, let me summarize this blog for you.
The People’s Pantry Blog is all about:
  • Storing and Processing your weekly VEG
  • Recipes
  • Menu Planning
  • Kitchen Organization
  • Saving Money on Groceries
Let me tell you a little about myself…

First off, you may have noticed I share the same last name as Angelica, your CSA Manager.  Yes, we are related.  I have the privilege of being this young lady’s mother.  I also consider myself extended family to all of the OPF farmers.

For three seasons now, I have been a CSA member.  My other two daughters have volunteered at the farm, I’ve attended farm events, got my hands dirty a few times, and sat at the edge of my seat as OPF lives and breathes and grows.  I am proud to be a part of this amazing community of farmers, friends and family.

I am a stay at home mother of 4 children ranging from 20 years to 10 months. Angelica, Emma, Natalie, and J. Abraham.  My husband and I waited 10 years after our third daughter before we decided to try for a boy.  In March of 2016, we were blessed with a son.
I have an associate degree in nutrition and a background in food service management.  For 12 years after college, I was part of the kitchen management at the VA Hospital in Milwaukee where I helped to develop recipes and write menus. 

After the birth of my third daughter in 2006, I was diagnosed with a rare but serious autoimmune illness that nearly took my life.  My health challenges were the catalyst to my interest in sustainable food systems and clean eating. 

Learning about sustainable food systems and its relationship to health and the environment changed my life.  I began to dive head first into the movement, planning to someday own my own homestead, grow all of my own food and live off grid.  I stretched my small amount of allotted health to the max and after repeated relapses with my illness, I’ve finally come to terms with my physical limitations and realize I can’t do it all.  But that doesn’t mean I can’t participate…
So here I am, sitting at a computer, sharing my story and hoping that I can contribute to your CSA experience this year through blogging about some of my passions and offering some of my skills to you so you can make the most out of your CSA share.

Consider me your kitchen companion.  I may not be able to grow your food for you, but I know how to store, process, cook, plan recipes and menu plan. I am also an aspiring minimalist who keeps a tight food budget and loves organization.  Believe it or not, the skills I will be sharing with you are super fun for me and I’m sure I will learn a lot in the process.  I am looking forward to being your kitchen companion. :)

At Your Service,
Christine Immel
thepeoplespantry@gmail.com

P.S.  For now, you can expect one blog post per month this winter/spring and then weekly posts at the start of our 2017 weekly CSA deliveries in June. 
 
                                                                                          Next Topic for February:
                                                                                          The Value of Your CSA Dollars
CSA Sign-Up

Our 2017 CSA sign-up season is closed.  If you were a 2016 member and still want to renew your share, please email us to do so. All others who want to be put on our waiting list, please email us at csa@oldplankfarm.com

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